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Exposure to Aluminum May Contribute to Alzheimer’s (Video)

Exposure to Aluminum May Contribute to Alzheimer’s

 
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Walnuts May Reducing Risk, Delay Onset or Slow Progression of Alzheimer’s (Video)

Walnuts May Reducing Risk, Delay Onset or Slow Progression of Alzheimer’s

 
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Poison Prevention and Seniors, The Charlotte Today Program

Poison Prevention and Seniors, The Charlotte Today Program

 
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Our Friday Song of the Week – 19th Nervous Breakdown

Published on March 27, 2015 by in Songs

Our Friday Song of the Week – 19th Nervous Breakdown

 
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Alcohol, Chocolate Could Prevent Memory Loss, Dementia! (Video)

Alcohol, Chocolate Could Prevent Memory Loss, Dementia!

 
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Vibrating Insoles Could Improve Walking Gait (Video)

Vibrating Insoles Could Improve Walking Gait

 
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Vibrating Insoles Could Improve Walking Gait

Vibrating Insoles Could Improve Walking Gait
When researchers put a urethane foam insole with piezo-electric actuators delivering subsensory vibratory noise stimulation to the soles of the feet of 12 healthy community-dwelling elderly volunteers aged 65 – 90 years, the vibratory insoles significantly improved performance on measures of balance and gait that are associated with falls.

 

The objective of this study was to test whether subsensory vibratory noise applied to the sole of the foot using a novel piezo-electric vibratory insole, can significantly improve sensation, enhance balance, and reduce gait variability in elderly people.

 

Piezoelectricity is electrical energy produced from mechanical pressure (including motions such as walking). When pressure is applied to an object, a negative charge is produced on the expanded side and a positive charge on the compressed side. Once the pressure is relieved, electrical current flows across the material.

 

A piezo-electric transducer comprises a “crystal” sandwiched between two metal plates. When a sound wave strikes one or both of the plates, the plates vibrate. My guess is the vibration of the insoles somehow stimulates an older person to walk better or at least pay attention to their walking.

 

Scientists weigh in!

 

 
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Our Friday Song of the Week – Paint It Black

Published on March 20, 2015 by in Songs

Our Friday Song of the Week – Paint It Black

 
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Alcohol, Chocolate Could Prevent Memory Loss, Dementia!

I means what’s better!?

Alcohol, Chocolate Could Prevent Memory Loss, Dementia!

Alcohol and chocolate may help prevent memory loss, dementia two research show.

Researchers find that drinking a moderate amount of alcohol might preserve cognitive functioning, while a natural compound in cocoa can reverse age-related memory loss.

Findings published in the American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease & Other Dementias show that alcohol consumption in late life, but not midlife, is associated with episodic memory and larger hippocampal volume.

The hippocampus is a part of the brain that plays an important role in short-term and long-term memory, as well as spatial navigation.

Another study, published in the Nature Neuroscience journal, finds that naturally occurring flavanols in cocoa reverse mild memory loss in older adults.

This study also looks to the hippocampus as a measure of the “treatment’s” success. The dentate gyrus (DG) is a region in the hippocampal region whose function declines in association with human aging and is thus considered to be a possible source of age-related memory decline.

Researches tested the effect of cocoa in a controlled randomized trial of healthy 50- to 69-year-olds who consumed either a high or low cocoa-containing diet for three months.

And they found that those with a high cocoa-containing, or high-flavanol, diet enhanced DG function, as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and by cognitive testing.

 

 
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Walnuts May Reducing Risk, Delay Onset or Slow Progression of Alzheimer’s

Who can forget the Dick Van Dyke “Walnut” Episode. Hey kids look it up!

Walnuts May Reducing Risk, Delay Onset or Slow Progression of Alzheimer’s

A study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease indicates that a diet including walnuts may have a beneficial effect in reducing the risk, delaying the onset, slowing the progression of, or preventing Alzheimer’s disease.

Research led by Abha Chauhan, PhD, head of the Developmental Neuroscience Laboratory at the New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities (IBR), found significant improvement in learning skills, memory, reducing anxiety, and motor development in mice fed a walnut-enriched diet.

The researchers suggest that the high antioxidant content of walnuts may have been a contributing factor in protecting the mouse brain from the degeneration typically seen in Alzheimer’s disease. Oxidative stress and inflammation are prominent features in this disease.

“These findings are very promising and help lay the groundwork for future human studies on walnuts and Alzheimer’s disease – a disease for which there is no known cure,”
said lead researcher Dr. Abha Chauhan, PhD. “Our study adds to the growing body of research that demonstrates the protective effects of walnuts on cognitive functioning.”

The research group examined the effects of dietary supplementation on mice with 6 percent or 9 percent walnuts, which are equivalent to 1 ounce and 1.5 ounces per day, respectively, of walnuts in humans. This research stemmed from a previous cell culture study led by Dr. Chauhan that highlighted the protective effects of walnut extract against the oxidative damage caused by amyloid beta protein. This protein is the major component of amyloid plaques that form in the brains of those with Alzheimer’s disease.

Walnuts have other nutritional benefits as they contain numerous vitamins and minerals and are the only nut that contains a significant source of alpha-linolenic acid, an omega-3 fatty acid with heart and brain-health benefits. The researchers also suggest that ALA may have played a role in improving the behavioral symptoms seen in the study.

An article detailing these findings, “Dietary Supplementation of Walnuts Improves Memory Deficits and Learning Skills in Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease,” was published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

The study was supported in part by funds from the New York State Office for People with Developmental Disabilities and the California Walnut Commission.

 
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