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Life Expectancy Calculator – Charlotte Today

For those of you who watched Charlotte Today, you heard mentioned a Life Expectancy Calculator.

The Living to 100 Life Expectancy Calculator uses the most current and carefully researched medical and scientific data in order to estimate how old you will live to be. Most people score in their late eighties… how about you?
The calculator asks you 40 quick questions related to your health and family history, and takes about 10 minutes to complete. At the end, you will be asked to create an account to store your answers.

Here’s a link. I took it and it says I’ll be around until I’m 98!

 
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The Christmas Song

 

The Christmas Song

 
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Silver Bells

 

Silver Bells

 
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Living to 100 – Our Latest Appearance on The Charlotte Today Show

Living to 100 – Our Latest Appearance on The Charlotte Today Show

 
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72% of Pre-retirees Say Ideal Retirement Will Include Work

72% of Pre-retirees Say Ideal Retirement Will Include Work

According to a A Merrill Lynch Retirement Study, conducted in partnership with Age Wave, seventy-two percent of pre-retirees over the age of 50 say their ideal retirement will include working – often in new, more flexible and fulfilling ways. This comprehensive study explores and challenges commonly held beliefs about work during retirement – a phenomenon driven by longer life expectancy, the elimination of most employee pensions, financial need and the re-imagining of later life.

“The New Retirement Workscape” revealed through this study is already a modern-day reality for many people – with half of current retirees having worked or planning to work during their retirement years. The study delves into the motivations driving this trend and helps to debunk four myths about working in retirement, including:

  • Retirement means the end of work.
  • Retirement is a time of decline.
  • People primarily work in retirement because they need the money.
  • New career ambitions are for young people.

The research also defines – for the first time – the four types of working retirees, each with distinct priorities, ambitions and reasons behind why they choose to work. Working retirees surveyed share their experiences and lessons learned, offering useful tips to help people prepare for a successful retirement career.

This is the third in a series of studies conducted in partnership with Age Wave to help Merrill Lynch better understand the new retirement realities people are facing across seven life priorities. The study was conducted in March 2014 and is based on a nationally representative survey of more than 7,000 respondents. To learn more about the findings, download the study here.

 
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Ave Maria

 

Ave Maria

 
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The Most Wonderful Time of the Year

 

The Most Wonderful Time of the Year

 
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Depression Can Independently Impact Dementia

Depression Can Independently Impact Dementia

How Is Depression Related to Dementia? A new study published in the online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology gives insight into the relationship between depression and dementia.

“Studies have shown that people with symptoms of depression are more likely to develop dementia, but we haven’t known how the relationship works,” said study author Robert S. Wilson, PhD, with Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. “Is the depression a consequence of the dementia? Do both problems develop from the same underlying problems in the brain? Or does the relationship of depression with dementia have nothing to do with dementia-related pathology?”

The current study indicates that the association of depression with dementia is independent of dementia-related brain changes. “These findings are exciting because they suggest depression truly is a risk factor for dementia, and if we can target and prevent or treat depression and causes of stress we may have the potential to help people maintain their thinking and memory abilities into old age,” Wilson said.

The study involved 1,764 people from the Religious Orders Study and the Rush Memory and Aging Project with an average age of 77 who had no thinking or memory problems at the start of the study. Participants were screened every year for symptoms of depression, such as loneliness and lack of appetite, and took tests on their thinking and memory skills for an average of eight years. A total of 680 people died during the study, and autopsies were performed on 582 of them to look for the plaques and tangles in the brain that are the signs of dementia and other signs of damage in the brain.

During the study, 922 people, or 52 percent of the participants, developed mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or mild problems with memory and thinking abilities that is often a precursor to Alzheimer’s disease. A total of 315 people, or 18 percent, developed dementia.

The researchers found no relationship between how much damage was found in the brain and the level of depression symptoms people had or in the change in depression symptoms over time.

People who developed mild cognitive impairment were more likely to have a higher level of symptoms of depression before they were diagnosed, but they were no more likely to have any change in symptoms of depression after the diagnosis than people without MCI. People with dementia were also more likely to have a higher level of depression symptoms before the dementia started, but they had a more rapid decrease in depression symptoms after dementia developed.

Having a higher level of depression symptoms was associated with more rapid decline in thinking and memory skills, accounting for 4.4 percent of the difference in decline that could not be attributed to the level of damage in the brain.

 
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I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus

I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus

 
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A Backwards 12 Days of Christmas – Winter Wonderland

While the 12 Days of Christmas starts on Christmas, I decided to go backwards and post a holiday song, one a day, for 12 days leading up to Christmas Eve. Here is the first. Winter Wonderland. Enjoy.

 
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